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Revolutionising the Plate: Disruptor® Technology and the Eco-Friendly Evolution of F&B

In an era marked by growing environmental concerns and a heightened focus on personal health, the food and beverage (F&B) industry is undergoing a transformative shift. Consumers are becoming increasingly aware of the impact of their dietary choices on both their well-being and the planet. As a result, the demand for healthier, sustainably produced food and drinks is surging. This paradigm shift is not only influencing what ends up on our plates but also how it gets there.

The environmental toll of traditional food production

Traditional methods of food and beverage production have long been associated with significant environmental consequences. From deforestation for agriculture to excessive water consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, our conventional approach to feeding the global population has been taking a toll on the planet.

But that’s how it’s grown.  What about how it is made?

Consumers drive change

The shift towards sustainability is not solely driven by environmental concerns; consumers are also demanding healthier alternatives. As people become more conscious of their diets, they are seeking products that align with their health and wellness goals. This shift in consumer preferences is acting as a catalyst for the F&B industry to reassess and reformulate its products and how those products are processed.

Disruptor Technology: A game-changer for sustainability

Enter Disruptor® technology, a revolutionary force that is reshaping the landscape of food and beverage production. Disruptive technology is an innovative solution that challenges and replaces or fundamentally enhances traditional methods, offering more efficient, sustainable, and often healthier alternatives.

Disruptor® technology can process ‘whole’ organic material – meaning that the technology allows for things like whole orange, lemon, or apple juice for example.  It can also easily process all parts of the animal meat carcass – including 4th and 5th quarter meats – unlike any other processing equipment. No rendering required.

Making use of the entire plant or the entire animal has exponential positive impact on our environment – making the most of what we already have…

Reducing food waste

With billions of tons of food wasted each year globally, advancements in smart packaging, preservation techniques, and supply chain management are helping minimize the environmental impact of food production. However, it can now go beyond these measures as Green Cell Technologies’ has perfected Dynamic Cellular Disruption (DCD) through the Disruptor machine to process whole organic material without waste.  Or, the same process and technology can take existing waste streams, sterilise any micro or pathogens and turn ‘waste’ into ‘value.’  Waste can be reduced or completely eradicated.

Plant-based alternatives

The rise of plant-based alternatives is another disruptive force making waves. Companies are leveraging technology to create plant-based products that mimic the taste and texture of traditional meat, providing environmentally friendly options for consumers looking to reduce their ecological footprint.

Precision agriculture

In the realm of utilising data, sensors, and automation, farmers can optimize resource use, reduce waste, and minimise environmental impact. This not only benefits the planet but also contributes to the production of healthier crops – imagine disrupting all the goodness from improved rootstock?

As consumers increasingly prioritise healthier and more sustainable choices, the F&B industry is compelled to embrace new technologies that align with these values. The marriage of technology and sustainability is not just a trend; it’s an imperative for the survival of our planet. By supporting innovations that reduce waste, lower carbon footprints, and promote healthier eating, we can collectively contribute to a more sustainable and climate-friendly future—one bite and sip at a time.

Look out for the Green Cell Technologies (GCT) leaf on your favourite products to know that your manufacturer is using DCD and Disruptor technology.  No leaf – ask the manufacturer why they are not taking your health and the planet seriously…

Conscious Eating

The food industry is experiencing significant trends related to consumer preference for whole and natural foods, driven by a desire for preventative care, improved mental health, and overall wellness.  Ignited by the COVID-19 era, consumers are becoming more health-conscious and interested in the quality of their food, leading to several notable shifts in the industry:

  1. Preventative care – Consumers are increasingly adopting a proactive approach to their health by focusing on preventive measures, which includes choosing foods that can support their well-being. There is a growing awareness of how diet can influence overall health, and many are seeking whole and natural foods with specific health benefits, such as antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals.
  2. Mental health and wellness – Mental health is gaining prominence as an important aspect of overall well-being. People are recognizing the link between diet and mental health, leading to a demand for foods that can support cognitive function, reduce stress, and improve mood. Whole and natural foods are seen as a key component of a holistic approach to mental wellness.
  3. Transparency and clean labelling – Consumers are becoming more discerning about what they consume. They want to know where their food comes from, how it’s made, and what ingredients are used. Clean labeling and transparency in food production are important, as people seek to avoid additives, preservatives, and highly processed ingredients.
  4. Sustainability – Sustainability is a critical concern for modern consumers. They are looking for food options that are not only good for their health but also environmentally friendly. Sustainable sourcing, packaging, and production practices are increasingly important to many consumers.
  5. Plant-based and natural alternatives – The rise of plant-based diets and a focus on natural ingredients is evident. People are exploring plant-based proteins, dairy alternatives, and minimally processed foods as part of their dietary choices.

Green Cell Technologies’ Disruptor technology can potentially make a significant difference in addressing these trends. The technology is known for its ability to efficiently extract valuable compounds from plant-based materials while preserving their natural attributes. Here’s how it aligns with the trends:

  1. Nutrient preservation – Disruptor technology can help preserve the natural nutritional components of whole foods, ensuring that consumers receive the full spectrum of health benefits these foods offer. This aligns with the trend of preventive care, where consumers are looking for nutrient-rich-options.
  2. Clean labelling – The technology allows for the production of clean-label products by extracting valuable compounds from natural sources without the need for synthetic additives or solvents. This appeals to consumers who prioritize transparency in food production.
  3. Plant-based and natural alternatives – the technology can be used to extract and concentrate plant-based ingredients, making it valuable in the development of plant-based foods, supplements, and natural alternatives that align with current consumer preferences.
  4. Sustainability – Green Cell Technologies’ Disruptor technology can contribute to sustainability by reducing waste and making more efficient use of raw materials in the food production process.

As consumers become more discerning about what they eat and seek whole, natural, and nutrient-rich foods for their well-being, technologies like the Disruptor and the Dynamic Cellular Disruption process, can play a role in meeting these demands. The technology’s ability to extract valuable compounds from natural sources efficiently can support the development of products that cater to the evolving preferences of health-conscious consumers.

Podcast: The Movement to Conscious Capitalism – with Roy Henderson

Roy Henderson discusses the movement to conscious capitalism with Nicci Robertson on the RE~INVENT Podcast.

Listen online or on Spotify.

We don’t have a food crisis, we have a food waste crisis – South Africa

If you want to know how much food the world wastes, the internet is your friend.

It can tell you about the farm in the United States (US) that dumps at least a quarter of its potatoes for being too big, too small, too ugly or the “wrong” colour. Or about how food waste is responsible for 8% of all pollution.

Staying in the US, because it is a well-monitored microcosm of a global problem, as well as home to the world’s biggest garbage mountain, food manufacturers generate 55 000 tonnes of waste a day by trimming off edible skin, fat, crusts and peels.

Imagine being aboard the International Space Station and watching trillions of dollars being sucked into orbit every year by a sinister alien invader seeking to break the back of Earth’s economy: that’s what food waste does.

Even in Africa, home to many of the world’s hungriest people, the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation says the amount of food wasted could feed an additional 300 million people.

Read the full article on farmingportal.co.za

#Consciouscapitalism: The new imperative for food and beverage manufacturers

The world has an opportunity to reboot itself into a healthier, more sustainable and equitable position post-COVID-19. Whether we take advantage of this valuable reprieve from our pre-virus path remains to be seen.  

Every facet of our human existence is affected, perhaps not directly by this particular coronavirus but, certainly, by the resultant lockdown of the global economy. While I cannot comment on other industries, I can say beyond a shadow of a doubt that the food and beverage manufacturing sectors have to change.

The current way in which the majority of our food and beverage is produced is detrimental to humans, to our animal kingdom and to the planet as a whole. Many of our processes in play today were designed at the advent of the industrial revolution. They use only a fraction of the available nutrition we essentially need to function optimally, are expensive to operate and generate vast amounts of waste.

Read full article on fooddive.com